Backup & Recovery Scenarios

User Managed Recovery Scenarios And Configuration

1. Complete Closed Database Recovery. System tablespace is missing
2. Complete Open Database Recovery. Non system tablespace is missing
3. Complete Open Database Recovery (when the database is initially closed). Non system tablespace is missing
4. Recovery of a Missing Datafile that has no backups.
5. Restore and Recovery of a Datafile to a different location.
6. Control File Recovery
7. Incomplete Recovery, Until Time/Sequence/Cancel
RMAN Recovery Scenarios And Configuration
1. Complete Closed Database Recovery. System tablespace is missing
2. Complete Open Database Recovery. Non system tablespace is missing
3. Complete Open Database Recovery (when the database is initially closed). Non system tablespace is missing
4. Recovery of a Datafile that has no backups.
5. Restore and Recovery of a Datafile to a different location.
6. Control File Recovery
7. Incomplete Recovery, Until Time/Sequence/Cancel
User Managed Recovery Scenarios
User managed recovery scenarios do require that the database is in archive log mode, and that backups of all datafiles and control files are made with the tablespaces set to begin backup, if the database is open while the copy is made. At the end of the copy of each tablespace it is necessaire to take it out of backup mode. Alternatively complete backups can be made with the database shutdown. Online redologs can be optionally backed up. Files to be copied: select name from v$datafile;
select member from v$logfile; # optional select name from v$controlfile;
Complete Closed Database Recovery. System tablespace is missing
If the system tablespace is missing or corrupted the database cannot be started up so a complete closed database recovery must be performed. Pre requisites: A closed or open database backup and archived logs.
1. Use OS commands to restore the missing or corrupted system datafile to its original location, ie: cp -p /user/backup/uman/system01.dbf /user/oradata/u01/dbtst/system01.dbf
2. startup mount;
3. recover datafile 1;
4. alter database open;

Complete Open Database Recovery. Non system tablespace is missing
If a non system tablespace is missing or corrupted while the database is open, recovery can be performed while the database remain open. Pre requisites: A closed or open database backup and archived logs.
1. Use OS commands to restore the missing or corrupted datafile to its original location, ie: cp -p /user/backup/uman/user01.dbf /user/oradata/u01/dbtst/user01.dbf
2. alter tablespace <tablespace_name> offline immediate;
3. recover tablespace <tablespace_name>;
4. alter tablespace <tablespace_name> online;

Complete Open Database Recovery (when the database is initially closed). Non system tablespace is missing
If a non system tablespace is missing or corrupted and the database crashed, recovery can be performed after the database is open. Pre requisites: A closed or open database backup and archived logs.
1. startup; (you will get ora-1157 ora-1110 and the name of the missing datafile, the database will remain mounted)
2. Use OS commands to restore the missing or corrupted datafile to its original location, ie: cp -p /user/backup/uman/user01.dbf /user/oradata/u01/dbtst/user01.dbf
3. alter database datafile3 offline; (tablespace cannot be used because the database is not open)
4. alter database open;
5. recover datafile 3;
6. alter tablespace <tablespace_name> online;

Recovery of a Missing Datafile that has no backups (database is open).
If a non system datafile that was not backed up since the last backup is missing, recovery can be performed if all archived logs since the creation of the missing datafile exist. Pre requisites: All relevant archived logs.
1. alter tablespace <tablespace_name> offline immediate;
2. alter database create datafile ‘/user/oradata/u01/dbtst/newdata01.dbf’;
3. recover tablespace <tablespace_name>;
4. alter tablespace <tablespace_name> online;
If the create datafile command needs to be executed to place the datafile on a location different than the original use:
alter database create datafile ‘/user/oradata/u01/dbtst/newdata01.dbf’ as ‘/user/oradata/u02/dbtst/newdata01.dbf’

Restore and Recovery of a Datafile to a different location.
If a non system datafile is missing and its original location not available, restore can be made to a different location and recovery performed. Pre requisites: All relevant archived logs.
1. Use OS commands to restore the missing or corrupted datafile to the new location, ie: cp -p /user/backup/uman/user01.dbf /user/oradata/u02/dbtst/user01.dbf
2. alter tablespace <tablespace_name> offline immediate;
3. alter tablespace <tablespace_name> rename datafile ‘/user/oradata/u01/dbtst/user01.dbf’ to ‘/user/oradata/u02/dbtst/user01.dbf’;
4. recover tablespace <tablespace_name>;
5. alter tablespace <tablespace_name> online;

Control File Recovery
Always multiplex your controlfiles. Controlfiles are missing, database crash. Pre requisites: A backup of your controlfile and all relevant archived logs.
1. startup; (you get ora-205, missing controlfile, instance start but database is not mounted)
2. Use OS commands to restore the missing controlfile to its original location: cp -p /user/backup/uman/control01.dbf /user/oradata/u01/dbtst/control01.dbf cp -p /user/backup/uman/control02.dbf /user/oradata/u01/dbtst/control02.dbf
3. alter database mount;
4. recover automatic database using backup controlfile;
5. alter database open resetlogs;
6. make a new complete backup, as the database is open in a new incarnation and previous archived log are not relevant.

Incomplete Recovery, Until Time/Sequence/Cancel
Incomplete recovery may be necessaire when an archived log is missing, so recovery can only be made until the previous sequence, or when an important object was dropped, and recovery needs to be made until before the object was dropped. Pre requisites: A closed or open database backup and archived logs, the time or sequence that the ‘until’ recovery needs to be performed.
1. If the database is open, shutdown abort
2. Use OS commands to restore all datafiles to its original locations: cp -p /user/backup/uman/u01/*.dbf /user/oradata/u01/dbtst/ cp -p /user/backup/uman/u02/*.dbf /user/oradata/u01/dbtst/ cp -p /user/backup/uman/u03/*.dbf /user/oradata/u01/dbtst/ cp -p /user/backup/uman/u04/*.dbf /user/oradata/u01/dbtst/ etc…
3. startup mount;
4. recover automatic database until time ‘2004-03-31:14:40:45′;
5. alter database open resetlogs;
6. make a new complete backup, as the database is open in a new incarnation and previous archived log are not relevant.
Alternatively you may use instead of until time, until sequence or until cancel:
recover automatic database until sequence 120 thread 1; OR recover database until cancel;

Rman Recovery Scenarios
Rman recovery scenarios require that the database is in archive log mode, and that backups of datafiles, control files and archived redolog files are made using Rman. Incremental Rman backups may be used also. Rman can be used with the repository installed on the archivelog, or with a recovery catalog that may be installed in the same or other database. Configuration and operation recommendations:
Set the parameter controlfile autobackup to ON to have with each backup a controlfile backup also:
configure controlfile autobackup on;
Set the parameter retention policy to the recovery window you want to have, ie redundancy 2 will keep the last two backups
available, after executing delete obsolete commands:
configure retention policy to redundancy 2;
Execute your full backups with the option ‘plus archivelogs’ to include your archivelogs with every backup:
backup database plus archivelog;
Perform daily maintenance routines to maintain on your backup directory the number of backups you need only:
crosscheck backup;
crosscheck archivelog all;
delete noprompt obsolete backup;
To work with Rman and a database based catalog follow these steps:
1. sqlplus /
2. create tablespace repcat;
3. create user rcuser identified by rcuser default tablespace repcat temporary tablespace temp;
4. grant connect, resource, recovery_catalog_owner to rcuser
5. exit
6. rman catalog rcuser/rcuser # connect to rman catalog as the rcuser
7. create catalog # create the catalog
8. connect target / #

Complete Closed Database Recovery. System tablespace is missing
In this case complete recovery is performed, only the system tablespace is missing, so the database can be opened without reseting the redologs.
1. rman target /
2. startup mount;
3. restore database;
4. recover database;
5. alter database open;

Complete Open Database Recovery. Non system tablespace is missing, database is up
1. rman target /
2. sql ‘alter tablespace <tablespace_name> offline immediate’;
3. restore datafile 3;
4. recover datafile 3;
5. sql ‘alter tablespace <tablespace_name> online’;

Complete Open Database Recovery (when the database is initially closed). Non system tablespace is missing
A user datafile is reported missing when tryin to startup the database. The datafile can be turned offline and the database started up. Restore and recovery are performed using Rman. After recovery is performed the datafile can be turned online again.
1. sqlplus /nolog
2. connect / as sysdba
3. startup mount
4. alter database datafile ‘<datafile_name>’ offline;
5. alter database open;
6. exit;
7. rman target /
8. restore datafile ‘<datafile_name>’;
9. recover datafile ‘<datafile_name>’;
10. sql ‘alter tablespace <tablespace_name> online’;

Recovery of a Datafile that has no backups (database is up).
If a non system datafile that was not backed up since the last backup is missing, recovery can be performed if all archived logs since the creation of the missing datafile exist. Since the database is up you can check the tablespace
name and put it offline. The option offline immediate is used to avoid that the update of the datafile header. Pre requisites: All relevant archived logs.
1. sqlplus ‘/ as sysdba’
2. alter tablespace <tablespace_name> offline immediate;
3. alter database create datafile ‘/user/oradata/u01/dbtst/newdata01.dbf;
4. exit
5. rman target /
6. recover tablespace <tablespace_name>;
7. sql ‘alter tablespace <tablespace_name> online’;
If the create datafile command needs to be executed to place the datafile on a location different than the original use:
alter database create datafile ‘/user/oradata/u01/dbtst/newdata01.dbf’ as ‘/user/oradata/u02/dbtst/newdata01.dbf’

Restore and Recovery of a Datafile to a different location. Database is up.
If a non system datafile is missing and its original location not available, restore can be made to a different location and recovery performed. Pre requisites: All relevant archived logs, complete cold or hot backup.
1. Use OS commands to restore the missing or corrupted datafile to the new location, ie: cp -p /user/backup/uman/user01.dbf /user/oradata/u02/dbtst/user01.dbf
2. alter tablespace <tablespace_name> offline immediate;
3. alter tablespace <tablespace_name> rename datafile ‘/user/oradata/u01/dbtst/user01.dbf’ to ‘/user/oradata/u02/dbtst/user01.dbf’;
4. rman target /
5. recover tablespace <tablespace_name>;
6. sql ‘alter tablespace <tablespace_name> online’;

Control File Recovery
Always multiplex your controlfiles. If you loose only one controlfile you can replace it with the one you have in place, and startup the Database. If both controlfiles are missing, the database will crash. Pre requisites: A backup of your controlfile and all relevant archived logs. When using Rman alway set configuration parameter autobackup of controlfile to ON. You will need the dbid to restore the controlfile, get it from the name of the backed up controlfile. It is the number following the ‘c-‘ at the start of the name.
1. rman target /
2. set dbid <dbid#>
3. startup nomount;
4. restore controlfile from autobackup;
5. alter database mount;
6. recover database;
7. alter database open resetlogs;
8. make a new complete backup, as the database is open in a new incarnation and previous archived log are not relevant.

Incomplete Recovery, Until Time/Sequence/Cancel
Incomplete recovery may be necessaire when the database crash and needs to be recovered, and in the recovery process you find that an archived log is missing. In this case recovery can only be made until the sequence before the one that is missing. Another scenario for incomplete recovery occurs when an important object was dropped or incorrect data was committed on it. In this case recovery needs to be performed until before the object was dropped. Pre requisites: A full closed or open database backup and archived logs, the time or sequence that the ‘until’ recovery needs to be performed.
1. If the database is open, shutdown it to perform full restore.
2. rman target
3. startup mount;
4. restore database;
5. recover database until sequence 8 thread 1; # you must pass the thread, if a single instance will always be 1.
6. alter database open resetlogs;
7. make a new complete backup, as the database is open in a new incarnation and previous archived log are not relevant.
Alternatively you may use instead of until sequence, until time, ie: ‘2004-12-28:01:01:10′.

Up To Time Based Recovery In RMAN

Point in time recovery using RMAN (until a log sequence number)

Recovery Objective

SQL> conn scott/tiger

Connected.

SQL> select count(*) from myobjects;

COUNT(*)

———-

249410

Switch a logfile

SQL> conn / as sysdba

Connected.

SQL> alter system switch logfile;

System altered.

Note the current log sequence number (13)

SQL> archive log list

Database log mode              Archive Mode

Automatic archival             Enabled

Archive destination            /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/arch

Oldest online log sequence     12

Next log sequence to archive   14

Current log sequence           14

Simulate an application failure – WRONG Delete!!

SQL> conn scott/tiger

Connected.

SQL> delete myobjects;

249410 rows deleted.

SQL> commit;

Commit complete.

The developer states that the wrong DML statement was made AFTER 8.15 AM and is positive about the same.

We need to determine the log sequence we need to recover until

select sequence#,first_change#, to_char(first_time,’HH24:MI:SS’) from v$log order by 3

SQL> /

SEQUENCE# FIRST_CHANGE# TO_CHAR(

———- ————- ——–

13       2760463 07:49:36

14       2761178 08:12:47

15       2766622 08:18:49

Log sequence 14 was first written to at 8:12 AM so we should recover to a log sequence before this – i.e sequence# 13

Shutdown and mount the database

SQL> shutdown immediate;

Database closed.

Database dismounted.

ORACLE instance shut down.

SQL> startup mount;

ORACLE instance started.

Total System Global Area  264241152 bytes

Fixed Size                  2070416 bytes

Variable Size             163580016 bytes

Database Buffers           92274688 bytes

Redo Buffers                6316032 bytes

Database mounted.

RMAN> run {

2> set until sequence=14;  >>> add one to the sequence number we have to recover until

3> restore database;

4> recover database;

5> }

executing command: SET until clause

Starting restore at 29-JAN-07

allocated channel: ORA_DISK_1

channel ORA_DISK_1: sid=154 devtype=DISK

allocated channel: ORA_SBT_TAPE_1

channel ORA_SBT_TAPE_1: sid=158 devtype=SBT_TAPE

channel ORA_SBT_TAPE_1: Data Protection for Oracle: version 5.2.4.0

channel ORA_DISK_1: starting datafile backupset restore

channel ORA_DISK_1: specifying datafile(s) to restore from backup set

restoring datafile 00001 to /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/system01.dbf

restoring datafile 00002 to /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/undotbs01.dbf

restoring datafile 00003 to /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/sysaux01.dbf

restoring datafile 00004 to /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/users01.dbf

restoring datafile 00005 to /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/users02.dbf

restoring datafile 00006 to /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/users03.dbf

restoring datafile 00007 to /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/users05.dbf

restoring datafile 00008 to /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/users06.dbf

restoring datafile 00009 to /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/users07.dbf

restoring datafile 00010 to /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/users04.dbf

restoring datafile 00011 to /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/drtbs1.dbf

restoring datafile 00012 to /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/drtbs2.dbf

channel ORA_DISK_1: reading from backup piece /opt/oracle/backup/opsdba/OPSDBA.20070129.161.1.1.613122551

channel ORA_DISK_1: restored backup piece 1

piece handle=/opt/oracle/backup/opsdba/OPSDBA.20070129.161.1.1.613122551 tag=TAG20070129T074911

channel ORA_DISK_1: restore complete, elapsed time: 00:00:16

Finished restore at 29-JAN-07

Starting recover at 29-JAN-07

using channel ORA_DISK_1

using channel ORA_SBT_TAPE_1

starting media recovery

archive log thread 1 sequence 13 is already on disk as file /u02/ORACLE/opsdba/arch/arch_1_13_613052894.dbf

channel ORA_DISK_1: starting archive log restore to default destination

channel ORA_DISK_1: restoring archive log

archive log thread=1 sequence=12

channel ORA_DISK_1: reading from backup piece /opt/oracle/backup/opsdba/OPSDBA.20070129.162.1.1.613122577

channel ORA_DISK_1: restored backup piece 1

piece handle=/opt/oracle/backup/opsdba/OPSDBA.20070129.162.1.1.613122577 tag=TAG20070129T074937

channel ORA_DISK_1: restore complete, elapsed time: 00:00:02

archive log filename=/u02/ORACLE/opsdba/arch/arch_1_12_613052894.dbf thread=1 sequence=12

archive log filename=/u02/ORACLE/opsdba/arch/arch_1_13_613052894.dbf thread=1 sequence=13

media recovery complete, elapsed time: 00:00:01

Finished recover at 29-JAN-07

RMAN> sql ‘alter database open resetlogs’;

sql statement: alter database open resetlogs

Confirm that the recovery has worked

opsdba:/opt/tivoli/tsm/client/oracle/bin64>sqlplus scott/tiger

SQL*Plus: Release 10.2.0.2.0 – Production on Mon Jan 29 09:43:14 2007

Copyright (c) 1982, 2005, Oracle.  All Rights Reserved.

Connected to:

Oracle Database 10g Enterprise Edition Release 10.2.0.2.0 – 64bit Production

With the Partitioning, Oracle Label Security, OLAP and Data Mining options

SQL> select count(*) from myobjects;

COUNT(*)

———-

249410

Duplicate database using RMAN on the same host

Duplicate database using RMAN on the same host


Primary Database SID:       APPLEPRD
Duplicate Database SID:    APPLEDEV
RMAN Catalog SID:             N/A

=============================================================
Steps

1.  Identify and Backup the primary database.

2.  Determine how much disk space will be required.

3.  Ensuring you have enough space on your target server.

4.  Making the backup available for the duplicate process.

5.  Creating the init.ora & administration directories for the duplicate database.

6.  Ensuring SQL*NET connections to primary database are working.

7.  Prepare RMAN duplicate script.

8.  Execute the RMAN script.

9.   Duplicate database  ready.

  1. Identify and Backup the primary database

:/opt/oracle>. setAPPLEPRD

APPLEPRD:/opt/oracle> sql

SQL> select dbid,name,created,log_mode,force_logging from v$database;

DBID           NAME         CREATED   LOG_MODE      FORCED LOGGING

————– ————— ————— ——————–     —————————

237270920  APPLEPRD  24-OCT-06   ARCHIVELOG              YES

Note the DBID and the forced logging entries after the duplication the DBID of the new database will be different and forced logging will default to NO.

Check if a backup exists

APPLEPRD:/opt/oracle/admin/APPLEDEV/rman>rman target /

Recovery Manager: Release 9.2.0.4.0 – 64bit Production

connected to target database: APPLEPRD (DBID=237270920)

RMAN> list backup;

BS Key  Size       Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time

——- ———- ———– ———— —————

127     70M        SBT_TAPE    00:00:03     05-FEB-07

BP Key: 127   Status: AVAILABLE   Tag: TAG20070205T080655

Piece Name: APPLEPRD.20070205.127.1.1.613728415

List of Archived Logs in backup set 127

Thrd Seq     Low SCN    Low Time  Next SCN   Next Time

—- ——- ———- ——— ———- ———

1    247     15132772   27-JAN-07 15173934   01-FEB-07

1    248     15173934   01-FEB-07 15215150   02-FEB-07

1    249     15215150   02-FEB-07 15256190   02-FEB-07

1    250     15256190   02-FEB-07 15297296   03-FEB-07

1    251     15297296   03-FEB-07 15338448   04-FEB-07

1    252     15338448   04-FEB-07 15379521   04-FEB-07

1    253     15379521   04-FEB-07 15420516   05-FEB-07

1    254     15420516   05-FEB-07 15423007   05-FEB-07

BS Key  Type LV Size       Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time

——- —- — ———- ———– ———— —————

128     Full    537M       SBT_TAPE    00:00:42     05-FEB-07

BP Key: 128   Status: AVAILABLE   Tag: TAG20070205T080659

Piece Name: APPLEPRD.20070205.128.1.1.613728419

List of Datafiles in backup set 128

File LV Type Ckp SCN    Ckp Time  Name

—- — —- ———- ——— —-

1       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/system01.dbf

2       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/undotbs01.dbf

3       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/tools01.dbf

4       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/users01.dbf

5       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/users02.dbf

6       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/tools02.dbf

7       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/example01.dbf

8       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/tools03.dbf

9       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/users03.dbf

10      Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/users04.dbf

11      Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/tools04.dbf

12      Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/drtest1.dbf

13      Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/drtest3.dbf

BS Key  Size       Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time

——- ———- ———– ———— —————

129     7K         SBT_TAPE    00:00:02     05-FEB-07

BP Key: 129   Status: AVAILABLE   Tag: TAG20070205T080744

Piece Name: APPLEPRD.20070205.129.1.1.613728464

List of Archived Logs in backup set 129

Thrd Seq     Low SCN    Low Time  Next SCN   Next Time

—- ——- ———- ——— ———- ———

1    255     15423007   05-FEB-07 15423042   05-FEB-07

BS Key  Type LV Size       Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time

——- —- — ———- ———– ———— —————

130     Full    3M         SBT_TAPE    00:00:00     05-FEB-07

BP Key: 130   Status: AVAILABLE   Tag:

Piece Name: c-237270920-20070205-00

SPFILE Included: Modification time: 27-JAN-07

As  per above there exists a backup and it is available, however if no backup exists you may fire the backup as follows:

APPLEPRD:/opt/oracle/admin/APPLEDEV/rman>rman target /

Recovery Manager: Release 9.2.0.4.0 – 64bit Production

connected to target database: APPLEPRD (DBID=237270920)

RMAN> backup device type sbt database plus archivelog;

Starting backup at 05-FEB-07

current log archived

using target database controlfile instead of recovery catalog

allocated channel: ORA_SBT_TAPE_1

channel ORA_SBT_TAPE_1: sid=11 devtype=SBT_TAPE

channel ORA_SBT_TAPE_1: Data Protection for Oracle: version 5.2.4.0

skipping archive log file /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/arch/arch190.log; already backed up 1 time(s)

skipping archive log file /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/arch/arch191.log; already backed up 1 time(s)

skipping archive log file /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/arch/arch240.log; already backed up 1 time(s)

channel ORA_SBT_TAPE_1: starting archive log backupset

channel ORA_SBT_TAPE_1: specifying archive log(s) in backup set

input archive log thread=1 sequence=241 recid=270 stamp=612980669

channel ORA_SBT_TAPE_1: starting piece 1 at 27-JAN-07

channel ORA_SBT_TAPE_1: finished piece 1 at 27-JAN-07

piece handle=APPLEPRD.20070127.113.1.1.612980669 comment=API Version 2.0,MMS Version 5.2.4.0

channel ORA_SBT_TAPE_1: backup set complete, elapsed time: 00:00:02

Finished backup at 05-FEB-07

………………………………………………………………. ………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………..

Starting Control File and SPFILE Autobackup at  05-FEB-07

piece handle=c-237270920-20070127-02 comment=API Version 2.0,MMS Version 5.2.4.0

Finished Control File and SPFILE Autobackup at 05-FEB-07

RMAN>exit

  1. 2. Determine how much disk space will be required.

After deciding what you will be duplicating, calculate the entire space this will required on the host.

SQL> select round(sum(bytes)/1048576) ||’ M – DATA’ as DATA

from dba_data_files;

select round(sum(bytes)/1048576) ||’ M – TEMP’ as TEMP

from dba_temp_files;

select round(sum(bytes)/1048576) ||’ M – LOGS’ as LOGS

from v$log;

1230 M –  DATA

100 M – TEMP

30 M –  LOGS

3. Ensuring you have enough space on your target server.

Prior to starting the duplicate process you must ensure you have enough disk space within file system to hold the database.

APPLEPRD:/opt/oracle>df -h

Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on

/dev/cciss/c0d0p8     4.9G  1.4G  3.2G  31% /

/dev/cciss/c0d0p2      25G   19G  4.4G  81% /opt

/dev/cciss/c0d0p11     14G   12G  2.1G  85% /u01

  1. Making the backup available for the duplicate process.

Verify the  backup is available.

APPLEPRD:/opt/oracle/admin/APPLEDEV/rman>rman target /

Recovery Manager: Release 9.2.0.4.0 – 64bit Production

connected to target database: APPLEPRD (DBID=237270920)

RMAN> list backup;

BS Key  Size       Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time

——- ———- ———– ———— —————

127     70M        SBT_TAPE    00:00:03     05-FEB-07

BP Key: 127   Status: AVAILABLE   Tag: TAG20070205T080655

Piece Name: APPLEPRD.20070205.127.1.1.613728415

List of Archived Logs in backup set 127

Thrd Seq     Low SCN    Low Time  Next SCN   Next Time

—- ——- ———- ——— ———- ———

1    247     15132772   27-JAN-07 15173934   01-FEB-07

1    248     15173934   01-FEB-07 15215150   02-FEB-07

1    249     15215150   02-FEB-07 15256190   02-FEB-07

1    250     15256190   02-FEB-07 15297296   03-FEB-07

1    251     15297296   03-FEB-07 15338448   04-FEB-07

1    252     15338448   04-FEB-07 15379521   04-FEB-07

1    253     15379521   04-FEB-07 15420516   05-FEB-07

1    254     15420516   05-FEB-07 15423007   05-FEB-07

BS Key  Type LV Size       Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time

——- —- — ———- ———– ———— —————

128     Full    537M       SBT_TAPE    00:00:42     05-FEB-07

BP Key: 128   Status: AVAILABLE   Tag: TAG20070205T080659

Piece Name: APPLEPRD.20070205.128.1.1.613728419

List of Datafiles in backup set 128

File LV Type Ckp SCN    Ckp Time  Name

—- — —- ———- ——— —-

1       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/system01.dbf

2       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/undotbs01.dbf

3       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/tools01.dbf

4       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/users01.dbf

5       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/users02.dbf

6       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/tools02.dbf

7       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/example01.dbf

8       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/tools03.dbf

9       Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/users03.dbf

10      Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/users04.dbf

11      Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/tools04.dbf

12      Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/drtest1.dbf

13      Full 15423009   05-FEB-07 /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/drtest3.dbf

BS Key  Size       Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time

——- ———- ———– ———— —————

129     7K         SBT_TAPE    00:00:02     05-FEB-07

BP Key: 129   Status: AVAILABLE   Tag: TAG20070205T080744

Piece Name: APPLEPRD.20070205.129.1.1.613728464

List of Archived Logs in backup set 129

Thrd Seq     Low SCN    Low Time  Next SCN   Next Time

—- ——- ———- ——— ———- ———

1    255     15423007   05-FEB-07 15423042   05-FEB-07

BS Key  Type LV Size       Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time

——- —- — ———- ———– ———— —————

130     Full    3M         SBT_TAPE    00:00:00     05-FEB-07

BP Key: 130   Status: AVAILABLE   Tag:

Piece Name: c-237270920-20070205-00

SPFILE Included: Modification time: 27-JAN-07


5 .  Creating the init.ora & administration directories for the duplicate database.

Create the directory structure of the dump destinations and of the datafiles etc.

Also create  set  file.

An easy way to create the dump directories is to copy the existing primary database dump directories and delete its contents

/opt/oracle/admin/> cp –rp APPLEPRD APPLEDEV

Find the filesystem directories of the database.

SQL> select distinct substr(name,1,instr(UPPER(name),’ORACLE’,1) – 1) “FILESYSTEM”

from v$datafile

UNION

select distinct substr(member,1,instr(UPPER(member),’ORACLE’,1) – 1) “FILESYSTEM”

from v$logfile

UNION

select distinct substr(name,1,instr(UPPER(name),’ORACLE’,1) – 1) “FILESYSTEM”

from v$controlfile;

FILESYSTEM

——————————————————————————–

/u01/

SQL> exit

/u01/ORACLE> mkdir  APPLEDEV

Copy the original initora file of the primary database in this case initAPPLEPRD.ora and replace all APPLEPRD references to APPLEDEV and make all necessary directory changes.

*.background_dump_dest=’/opt/oracle/admin/APPLEDEV/bdump’

*.control_files=’/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/control01.ctl’

*.core_dump_dest=’/opt/oracle/admin/APPLEDEV/cdump’

*.db_block_size=16384

*.db_cache_size=104857600

*.db_file_multiblock_read_count=8

*.db_file_name_convert=’/u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/’,’/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/’

*.db_name=’APPLEDEV’

*.java_pool_size=52428800

*.job_queue_processes=10

*.large_pool_size=8388608

*.log_archive_dest_1=’LOCATION=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/arch’

*.log_archive_dest_state_1=’ENABLE’

*.log_archive_format=’arch%s.log’

*.log_archive_start=TRUE

*.log_buffer=1048576

*.log_checkpoints_to_alert=TRUE

*.log_file_name_convert=’/u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/’,’/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/’

*.shared_pool_size=104857600

Ensure the db_file_name_convert  parameter is set appropiately. This parameter will instruct RMAN to convert the primary database filenames to the target database filenames. One can use the SET NEWNAME parameter too in the RMAN script  then db_file_name_convert parameter is not needed.

Create password file for new db

:/opt/oracle>. setAPPLEDEV

APPLEDEV:/opt/oracle> cd $ORACLE_HOME/dbs

APPLEDEV:/opt/oracle/product9204/dbs>orapwd file=orapwAPPLEDEV password=oracle entries=5

APPLEDEV:/opt/oracle/product9204/dbs>

6. Ensuring SQL*NET connections to primary database and RMAN catalog are working.

Ensure the production target database is open or at least mounted. If using a catalog database this must also be open. Test your SQL*NET connections: You must be able to connect to the primary DB as sysdba and make an rman connection to RMAN. Perform a basic test using sqlplus. When you have successfully connected exit sqlplus and move onto the next step.

APPLEDEV:/opt/oracle/admin/APPLEDEV/rman>sqlplus ‘sys/oracle@APPLEPRD as sysdba’

APPLEDEV:/opt/oracle/admin/APPLEDEV/rman> sqlplus rman/rman@RMAN   (not mandatory)

7. Prepare RMAN duplicate script.

Using  RMAN connect to the primary database  to  retrieve the SBT Channel settings. This setting has to be included in the RMAN Duplicate script.

APPLEPRD:/opt/oracle/admin/APPLEDEV/rman>rman target /

Recovery Manager: Release 9.2.0.4.0 – 64bit Production

connected to target database: APPLEPRD (DBID=237270920)

RMAN> show all;

using target database control file instead of recovery catalog

RMAN configuration parameters are:

CONFIGURE RETENTION POLICY TO RECOVERY WINDOW OF 7 DAYS;

CONFIGURE BACKUP OPTIMIZATION ON;

CONFIGURE DEFAULT DEVICE TYPE TO ‘SBT_TAPE’;

CONFIGURE CONTROLFILE AUTOBACKUP ON;

CONFIGURE CONTROLFILE AUTOBACKUP FORMAT FOR DEVICE TYPE ‘SBT_TAPE’ TO ‘%F’;

CONFIGURE CONTROLFILE AUTOBACKUP FORMAT FOR DEVICE TYPE DISK TO ‘/u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/arch/%F’;

CONFIGURE DEVICE TYPE SBT_TAPE PARALLELISM 1 BACKUP TYPE TO BACKUPSET; # default

CONFIGURE DEVICE TYPE DISK PARALLELISM 1 BACKUP TYPE TO BACKUPSET; # default

CONFIGURE DATAFILE BACKUP COPIES FOR DEVICE TYPE SBT_TAPE TO 1; # default

CONFIGURE DATAFILE BACKUP COPIES FOR DEVICE TYPE DISK TO 1; # default

CONFIGURE ARCHIVELOG BACKUP COPIES FOR DEVICE TYPE SBT_TAPE TO 1; # default

CONFIGURE ARCHIVELOG BACKUP COPIES FOR DEVICE TYPE DISK TO 1; # default

CONFIGURE CHANNEL DEVICE TYPE ‘SBT_TAPE’ PARMS  ‘ENV=(TDPO_OPTFILE=/opt/tivoli/t

sm/client/oracle/bin64/tdpo.APPLEPRDd.opt)’ FORMAT   ‘%d.%T.%s.%p.%c.%t’;

CONFIGURE MAXSETSIZE TO UNLIMITED; # default

CONFIGURE ENCRYPTION FOR DATABASE OFF; # default

CONFIGURE ENCRYPTION ALGORITHM ‘AES128′; # default

CONFIGURE ARCHIVELOG DELETION POLICY TO NONE; # default

CONFIGURE SNAPSHOT CONTROLFILE NAME TO ‘/opt/oracle/product9204/dbs/snapcf_face.f’; # default

RMAN> exit

Note the current log sequence of the primary database APPLEPRD

SQL> archive log list

Database log mode              Archive Mode

Automatic archival             Enabled

Archive destination            /u01/ORACLE/fAPPLEPRD/arch

Oldest online log sequence     254

Next log sequence to archive   256

Current log sequence           256

Create a script create_APPLEDEV.rcv

Note the log sequence number and the channel parameters.

run{

allocate channel C1 DEVICE TYPE ‘SBT_TAPE’ PARMS ‘ENV=(TDPO_OPTFILE=/opt/tivoli/tsm/client/oracle/bin64/tdpo.APPLEPRDd.opt)’;

allocate auxiliary channel aux1 device type ‘SBT_TAPE’ PARMS ‘ENV=(TDPO_OPTFILE=/opt/tivoli/tsm/client/oracle/bin64/tdpo.APPLEPRDd.opt)’;

SET UNTIL SEQUENCE 256 THREAD 1;

duplicate target database to APPLEDEV;

}

Start the APPLEDEV instance in NOMOUNT mode. This will be your auxiliary instance.

:/opt/oracle> . setAPPLEDEV

APPLEDEV:/opt/oracle> sql

SQL*Plus: Release 9.2.0.4.0 – Production on Tue Feb 6 09:55:42 2007

Connected to an idle instance.

SQL> startup nomount;

ORACLE instance started.

Total System Global Area  287279592 bytes

Fixed Size                   731624 bytes

Variable Size             167772160 bytes

Database Buffers          117440512 bytes

Redo Buffers                1335296 bytes

SQL> exit

8. Execute the RMAN script.

Start RMAN, connect to the production target, the catalog instance and also the auxiliary clone. Run the RMAN duplicate script as shown above. Before doing this ensure that the Oracle SID environment variable is set to the duplicate clone database.

APPLEDEV:/opt/oracle/admin/APPLEDEV/rman>rman target  sys/oracle@ APPLEPRD as sysdba auxiliary /

Recovery Manager: Release 9.2.0.4.0 – 64bit Production

Copyright (c) 1995, 2002, Oracle Corporation.  All rights reserved.

connected to target database: APPLEPRD (DBID=237270920)

connected to auxiliary database: APPLEDEV (not mounted)

RMAN> spool log to APPLEDEV_creation.log

RMAN> @ create_APPLEDEV.rcv

RMAN> 1 > 2 > 3 > 4 >

Open another duplicate OS session and navigate to the directory that has the log file APPLEDEV_creation.log and do a tail –f APPLEDEV_creation.log to monitor the progress of the duplication.

APPLEDEV:/opt/oracle/admin/APPLEDEV/rman> tail –f APPLEDEV_creation.log

Spooling started in log file: APPLEDEV_creation.log

Recovery Manager: Release 9.2.0.4.0 – 64bit Production

RMAN>

RMAN> run{

2> allocate channel C1 DEVICE TYPE ‘SBT_TAPE’ PARMS ‘ENV=(TDPO_OPTFILE=/opt/tivoli/tsm/client/oracle/bin64/tdpo.APPLEPRDd.opt)’;

3> allocate auxiliary channel aux1 device type ‘SBT_TAPE’ PARMS ‘ENV=(TDPO_OPTFILE=/opt/tivoli/tsm/client/oracle/bin64/tdpo.APPLEPRDd.opt)’;

4> SET UNTIL SEQUENCE 256 THREAD 1;

5> duplicate target database to APPLEDEV;

6> }

using target database controlfile instead of recovery catalog

allocated channel: C1

channel C1: sid=15 devtype=SBT_TAPE

channel C1: Data Protection for Oracle: version 5.2.4.0

allocated channel: aux1

channel aux1: sid=12 devtype=SBT_TAPE

channel aux1: Data Protection for Oracle: version 5.2.4.0

executing command: SET until clause

Starting Duplicate Db at 05-FEB-07

printing stored script: Memory Script

{

set until scn  15423042;

set newname for datafile  1 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/system01.dbf”;

set newname for datafile  2 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/undotbs01.dbf”;

set newname for datafile  3 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools01.dbf”;

set newname for datafile  4 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users01.dbf”;

set newname for datafile  5 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users02.dbf”;

set newname for datafile  6 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools02.dbf”;

set newname for datafile  7 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/example01.dbf”;

set newname for datafile  8 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools03.dbf”;

set newname for datafile  9 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users03.dbf”;

set newname for datafile  10 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users04.dbf”;

set newname for datafile  11 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools04.dbf”;

set newname for datafile  12 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/drtest1.dbf”;

set newname for datafile  13 to

“/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/drtest3.dbf”;

restore

check readonly

clone database

;

}

executing script: Memory Script

executing command: SET until claus

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

Starting restore at 05-FEB-07

channel aux1: starting datafile backupset restore

channel aux1: specifying datafile(s) to restore from backup set

restoring datafile 00001 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/system01.dbf

restoring datafile 00002 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/undotbs01.dbf

restoring datafile 00003 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools01.dbf

restoring datafile 00004 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users01.dbf

restoring datafile 00005 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users02.dbf

restoring datafile 00006 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools02.dbf

restoring datafile 00007 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/example01.dbf

restoring datafile 00008 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools03.dbf

restoring datafile 00009 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users03.dbf

restoring datafile 00010 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users04.dbf

restoring datafile 00011 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools04.dbf

restoring datafile 00012 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/drtest1.dbf

restoring datafile 00013 to /u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/drtest3.dbf

channel aux1: restored backup piece 1

piece handle=APPLEPRD.20070205.128.1.1.613728419 tag=TAG20070205T080659 params=NULL

channel aux1: restore complete

Finished restore at 05-FEB-07

sql statement: CREATE CONTROLFILE REUSE SET DATABASE “APPLEDEV” RESETLOGS ARCHIVELOG

MAXLOGFILES     16

MAXLOGMEMBERS      2

MAXDATAFILES      200

MAXINSTANCES     1

MAXLOGHISTORY      454

LOGFILE

GROUP  1 ( ‘/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/redo01.log’ ) SIZE   10485760  REUSE,

GROUP  2 ( ‘/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/redo02.log’ ) SIZE   10485760  REUSE,

GROUP  3 ( ‘/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/redo03.log’ ) SIZE   10485760  REUSE

DATAFILE

‘/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/system01.dbf’

CHARACTER SET US7ASCII

printing stored script: Memory Script

{

switch clone datafile all;

}

executing script: Memory Script

datafile 2 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=1 stamp=613746385 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/undotbs01.dbf

datafile 3 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=2 stamp=613746385 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools01.dbf

datafile 4 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=3 stamp=613746385 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users01.dbf

datafile 5 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=4 stamp=613746385 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users02.dbf

datafile 6 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=5 stamp=613746385 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools02.dbf

datafile 7 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=6 stamp=613746385 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/example01.dbf

datafile 8 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=7 stamp=613746385 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools03.dbf

datafile 9 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=8 stamp=613746385 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users03.dbf

datafile 10 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=9 stamp=613746385 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users04.dbf

datafile 11 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=10 stamp=613746385 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools04.dbf

datafile 12 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=11 stamp=613746385 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/drtest1.dbf

datafile 13 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=12 stamp=613746385 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/drtest3.dbf

printing stored script: Memory Script

{

set until scn  15423042;

recover

clone database

delete archivelog

;

}

executing script: Memory Script

executing command: SET until clause

Starting recover at 05-FEB-07

starting media recovery

archive log thread 1 sequence 255 is already on disk as file /u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/arch/arch255.log

archive log filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEPRD/arch/arch255.log thread=1 sequence=255

media recovery complete

Finished recover at 05-FEB-07

printing stored script: Memory Script

{

shutdown clone;

startup clone nomount ;

}

executing script: Memory Script

database dismounted

Oracle instance shut down

connected to auxiliary database (not started)

Oracle instance started

Total System Global Area     354387512 bytes

Fixed Size                      742968 bytes

Variable Size                234881024 bytes

Database Buffers             117440512 bytes

Redo Buffers                   1323008 bytes

sql statement: CREATE CONTROLFILE REUSE SET DATABASE “APPLEDEV” RESETLOGS ARCHIVELOG

MAXLOGFILES     16

MAXLOGMEMBERS      2

MAXDATAFILES      200

MAXINSTANCES     1

MAXLOGHISTORY      454

LOGFILE

GROUP  1 ( ‘/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/redo01.log’ ) SIZE   10485760  REUSE,

GROUP  2 ( ‘/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/redo02.log’ ) SIZE   10485760  REUSE,

GROUP  3 ( ‘/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/redo03.log’ ) SIZE   10485760  REUSE

DATAFILE

‘/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/system01.dbf’

CHARACTER SET US7ASCII

printing stored script: Memory Script

{

catalog clone datafilecopy  “/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/undotbs01.dbf”;

catalog clone datafilecopy  “/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools01.dbf”;

catalog clone datafilecopy  “/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users01.dbf”;

catalog clone datafilecopy  “/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users02.dbf”;

catalog clone datafilecopy  “/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools02.dbf”;

catalog clone datafilecopy  “/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/example01.dbf”;

catalog clone datafilecopy  “/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools03.dbf”;

catalog clone datafilecopy  “/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users03.dbf”;

catalog clone datafilecopy  “/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users04.dbf”;

catalog clone datafilecopy  “/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools04.dbf”;

catalog clone datafilecopy  “/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/drtest1.dbf”;

catalog clone datafilecopy  “/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/drtest3.dbf”;

switch clone datafile all;

}

executing script: Memory Script

cataloged datafile copy

datafile copy filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/undotbs01.dbf recid=1 stamp=613746391

cataloged datafile copy

datafile copy filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools01.dbf recid=2 stamp=613746391

cataloged datafile copy

datafile copy filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users01.dbf recid=3 stamp=613746391

cataloged datafile copy

datafile copy filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users02.dbf recid=4 stamp=613746391

cataloged datafile copy

datafile copy filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools02.dbf recid=5 stamp=613746391

cataloged datafile copy

datafile copy filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/example01.dbf recid=6 stamp=613746391

cataloged datafile copy

datafile copy filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools03.dbf recid=7 stamp=613746391

cataloged datafile copy

datafile copy filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users03.dbf recid=8 stamp=613746391

cataloged datafile copy

datafile copy filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users04.dbf recid=9 stamp=613746391

cataloged datafile copy

datafile copy filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools04.dbf recid=10 stamp=613746391

cataloged datafile copy

datafile copy filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/drtest1.dbf recid=11 stamp=613746391

cataloged datafile copy

datafile copy filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/drtest3.dbf recid=12 stamp=613746391

datafile 2 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=1 stamp=613746391 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/undotbs01.dbf

datafile 3 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=2 stamp=613746391 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools01.dbf

datafile 4 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=3 stamp=613746391 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users01.dbf

datafile 5 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=4 stamp=613746391 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users02.dbf

datafile 6 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=5 stamp=613746391 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools02.dbf

datafile 7 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=6 stamp=613746391 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/example01.dbf

datafile 8 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=7 stamp=613746391 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools03.dbf

datafile 9 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=8 stamp=613746391 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users03.dbf

datafile 10 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=9 stamp=613746391 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/users04.dbf

datafile 11 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=10 stamp=613746391 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/tools04.dbf

datafile 12 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=11 stamp=613746391 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/drtest1.dbf

datafile 13 switched to datafile copy

input datafilecopy recid=12 stamp=613746391 filename=/u01/ORACLE/APPLEDEV/drtest3.dbf

printing stored script: Memory Script

{

Alter clone database open resetlogs;

}

executing script: Memory Script

database opened

Finished Duplicate Db at 05-FEB-07

released channel: C1

RMAN> **end-of-file**

  1. 9. Duplicate database  ready.

NOTE: The DBID is changed and FORCED LOGGING is set to NO. and now  there are two pmon processes one for each database.

SQL> select dbid,name,created,log_mode,force_logging from v$database;

DBID            NAME   CREATED  LOG_MODE   FORCED LOGGING

—————- ———   ————— ——————   —————————

338960471 APPLEDEV 05-FEB-07  ARCHIVELOG   NO

SQL>  exit

APPLEDEV:/opt/oracle>ps -ef | grep pmon

oracle   22385     1  0 10:39 ?        00:00:00 ora_pmon_APPLEPRD

oracle   24085     1  0 10:41 ?        00:00:00 ora_pmon_APPLEDEV

oracle   26510 17342  0 10:42 pts/2    00:00:00 grep pmon

APPLEDEV:/opt/oracle>

After registering this database in the listener. You may  do a TNS promote.

Controlfile Recover

SCENARIO – LOSS OF ALL CONTROLFILES (NO CATALOG)

SQL> insert into myobjects select * from myobjects;

919664 rows created.

SQL> commit;

Commit complete.

SQL> select count(*) from myobjects;

COUNT(*)

———-

1839328 >>>> need to check this record count after recovery

SQL> archive log list

Database log mode              Archive Mode

Automatic archival             Enabled

Archive destination            USE_DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST

Oldest online log sequence     5

Next log sequence to archive   7

Current log sequence           7

Note – current log sequence is 7 – not archived but contains the last committed changes that we made

Note – archive logs will not be found in $ARCV area, but in the flashback location

Simulate a failure

SQL> select name from v$controlfile;

NAME

——————————————————————————–

/u01/ORACLE/testdb/control01.ctl

/u01/ORACLE/testdb/control02.ctl

/u01/ORACLE/testdb/control03.ctl

SQL> !rm /u01/ORACLE/testdb/*.ctl

SQL> alter tablespace users online;

alter tablespace users online

*

ERROR at line 1:

ORA-00603: ORACLE server session terminated by fatal error

SQL> shutdown abort

ORACLE instance shut down.

SQL> startup nomount;

ORACLE instance started.

Total System Global Area  893386752 bytes

Fixed Size                  2076816 bytes

Variable Size             432017264 bytes

Database Buffers          452984832 bytes

Redo Buffers                6307840 bytes

Since we are not using a RMAN catalog we need to set the DBID

RMAN> set dbid=2415549446;

executing command: SET DBID

Restore the controlfile

RMAN> run {

2> restore controlfile from autobackup;

3> }

Starting restore at 10-JAN-10

using target database control file instead of recovery catalog

allocated channel: ORA_DISK_1

channel ORA_DISK_1: sid=156 devtype=DISK

recovery area destination: /u01/ORACLE/flash_recovery_area

database name (or database unique name) used for search: TESTDB

channel ORA_DISK_1: autobackup found in the recovery area

channel ORA_DISK_1: autobackup found: /u01/ORACLE/flash_recovery_area/TESTDB/autobackup/2010-01-10/o1_mf_s_633601094_3gynd74g_.bkp

channel ORA_DISK_1: control file restore from autobackup complete

output filename=/u01/ORACLE/testdb/control01.ctl

output filename=/u01/ORACLE/testdb/control02.ctl

output filename=/u01/ORACLE/testdb/control03.ctl

Finished restore at 10-JAN-10

Mount and recover the database

RMAN> alter database mount;

database mounted

released channel: ORA_DISK_1

RMAN> recover database;

Starting recover at 10-JAN-10

Starting implicit crosscheck backup at 10-JAN-10

allocated channel: ORA_DISK_1

channel ORA_DISK_1: sid=156 devtype=DISK

Crosschecked 1 objects

Finished implicit crosscheck backup at 10-JAN-10

Starting implicit crosscheck copy at 10-JAN-10

using channel ORA_DISK_1

Finished implicit crosscheck copy at 10-JAN-10

searching for all files in the recovery area

cataloging files…

cataloging done

List of Cataloged Files

=======================

File Name: /u01/ORACLE/flash_recovery_area/TESTDB/autobackup/2010-01-10/o1_mf_s_633601094_3gynd74g_.bkp

using channel ORA_DISK_1

allocated channel: ORA_SBT_TAPE_1

channel ORA_SBT_TAPE_1: sid=155 devtype=SBT_TAPE

channel ORA_SBT_TAPE_1: Data Protection for Oracle: version 5.2.4.0

datafile 4 not processed because file is offline

starting media recovery

archive log thread 1 sequence 6 is already on disk as file /u01/ORACLE/flash_recovery_area/TESTDB/archivelog/2010-01-10/o1_mf_1_6_3gyn7vnk_.arc

archive log thread 1 sequence 7 is already on disk as file /u01/ORACLE/testdb/redo03.log

archive log filename=/u01/ORACLE/flash_recovery_area/TESTDB/archivelog/2010-01-10/o1_mf_1_6_3gyn7vnk_.arc thread=1 sequence=6

archive log filename=/u01/ORACLE/testdb/redo03.log thread=1 sequence=7  >>>> current redo log with committed but unarchived changes applied

media recovery complete, elapsed time: 00:00:09

Finished recover at 10-JAN-10

SQL> alter database open resetlogs;

Database altered.

conn scott/tiger

Connected.

SQL> select count(*) from myobjects;

COUNT(*)

———-

1839328

RMAN Enhancements

RMAN Enhancements

In this section, we will discuss the new features of Recovery Manager (RMAN) in Oracle 10g.

Automated Channel Failover for Backup and Restore

In Oracle 10g, when multiple channels are allocated for a backup and restore operation, and one of the channels fails during the operation, RMAN continues the job on the remaining channels.  RMAN does not restart the backup or restore process for the failed channel.  Such a problem is typical when the media manager encounters problems with one tape drive.  RMAN reports a message in v$rman_output and in the output to the terminal or log file when it encounters such problems.

Automated File Creation During Recovery

This feature enhances RMAN recovery by automatically creating and recovering datafiles that have never been backed up.

In order to recover a data file that has never been backed up, you need the archive log files from the time of the data file creation until the time you wish to stop the recovery process, and a copy of the control file with the information regarding the data file.

Figure 12.5 Automated File Creation During Recovery

Simplified Backups to Disk

In previous releases of Oracle, RMAN had two separate commands to backup data files: BACKUP and COPY.  The BACKUP command backed up the data file only to backup set, which is a proprietary format recognized by RMAN only.  You must use RMAN to restore a data file from a backup set.  The COPY command generated image copies, which are bit-by-bit copies of data files.  You do not need RMAN to restore a database from an image copy.

The BACKUP DATABASE command can backup a whole database to backup sets without specifying each individual data file.  However, there is no corresponding COPY DATABASE command.  Therefore, you must run the REPORT SCHEMA command to determine the file names of the data files, and then you need to specify each data files in your COPY command.

RMAN> copy current controlfile to ‘dba/backup/grid/ctlfile.cpy’,

datafile 1 to ‘dba/backup/grid/df1.cp’y,

datafile 2 to ‘dba/backup/grid/df2.cp’y,

datafile 3 to ‘dba/backup/grid/df3.cp’y,

datafile 4 to ‘dba/backup/grid/df4.cp’y,

datafile 5 to ‘dba/backup/grid/df5.cp’y,

datafile 6 to ‘dba/backup/grid/df6.cp’y;

In Oracle 10g, the COPY command is abandoned in favor of an enhanced BACKUP command that enables you to specify where RMAN should create copies or backup sets.  You can use the new BACKUP AS COPY command to copy an entire database or multiple tablespaces, data files, and archived logs.

Here is an example to backup an entire database as an image copy to the recovery area.

RMAN> backup as copy

tag “weekly_backup” database;

Proxy Copy Backup of Archivelogs

The proxy functionality was first introduced in Oracle8i Release 1 (8.1.5).  A proxy copy is a special type of backup, in which RMAN turns over control of the data transfer to a media manager that supports this feature. The PROXY option of the BACKUP command specifies that a backup should be a proxy copy.

For each file that you attempt to back up using the BACKUP PROXY command, RMAN queries the media manager to determine whether it can perform a proxy copy. If the media manager cannot proxy copy the file, then RMAN uses conventional backup sets to perform the backup. An exception occurs when you use the PROXY ONLY option, which causes Oracle to issue an error message when it is unable to proxy copy.

Prior to Oracle 10g, you could RMAN to perform proxy backups of data files and data file copies.  However, you could not perform proxy backup of archive log files or control file copies.  You can now use RMAN to perform proxy backups of archive log files.  You can use the rc_proxy_archivelog dictionary view to determine the proxy backups recorded in the catalog.

RMAN> backup device type sbt proxy only

2> archivelog from logseq 35 thread 1;

Incrementally Updated Backups

In Oracle 10g, you can apply incremental backups to data file image copy backups to roll them forward to a specified point in time.  This new feature provides the following benefits:

  • By periodically updating image copies of data files with incremental backups, the updated image copy of the data file is moved forward to a more recent state (with more current SCN).  This could potentially result in reduced recovery time.
  • Avoids performing a full image copy after incremental backups.

Figure 12.6 Incrementally Updated Backups

Example

The following statement rolls forward an image copy of data file /dba/backup/grid/data01.imgcopy:

RMAN> recover datafilecopy ‘/dba/backup/grid/data15.imgcopy’;

Or, you can issue this command to perform the same operation:

RMAN> RECOVERY COPY OF DATAFILE 15;

Simplified Recovery Through Resetlogs

After you perform an incomplete (Point-in-time) recovery, you need to open the database with the RESETLOGS option:

SQL> alter database open resetlogs;

The RESETLOGS operation creates a new incarnation of the database and resets the logs.  Prior to Oracle 10g, the newly generated redo log files could not be used with the backups taken in the past.  Therefore, it was important to take an immediate backup, since all previous backups became invalid.  In addition, if you used the RMAN catalog for future backups, you needed to issue the following command to make the RMAN catalog aware of the new incarnation of the database.

RMAN> reset database;

In Oracle 10g, you no longer have to back up your database following an incomplete recovery and OPEN RESETLOGS operations.

This new feature is also applicable for the following two scenarios:

  • Performing a recovery using a backup control file and opening the database with the RESETLOGS operation.
  • Reinstantiation of  the old primary database following a failover (see the Flashback Reinstantiation section for details).

Benefits of Simplified Recovery Through Resetlogs

The Simplified Recovery Through Resetlogs feature provides the following benefits:

  • There is no need to perform a full backup after an incomplete recovery.
  • There is no need to recreate a new standby database after a failover operation.
  • There is no need to change any backup scripts, as there are no changes in the recovery commands to take advantage of this functionality.
  • You can take incremental backups based on full backups of a previous incarnation when you use RMAN.
  • Block media recovery can restore backups from parent incarnation backups and recover the corrupted blocks through a RESETLOGS operation.

How does it work?

You may wonder how can you use the newly generated logs with an earlier incarnation of the database.  Oracle 10g introduces a new format specification for archived log files.  This new format avoids overwriting archived redo log files with the same sequence number across incarnations.

SQL> show parameter log_archive_format

NAME                         TYPE        VALUE

—————————- ———– —————-

log_archive_format           string      %t_%s_%r.dbf

The format specification is %r and represents the resetlogs id.  It is included in the default format for the log_archive_format initialization parameter. It will ensure that a unique name is constructed for the archived redo log file during RMAN restore and SQL*plus auto recovery mode.

During the RESETLOGS operation, the information in v$log_history and v$offline_range records are no longer cleared.  In addition, two new columns have been added to indicate the incarnation the records belong to: resetlogs_change# and resetlogs_time.

Example:

SQL> select recid, thread#, sequence#, resetlogs_change#,resetlogs_time

2  from v$log_history

3  where rownum < 20;

RECID    THREAD#  SEQUENCE# RESETLOGS_CHANGE# RESETLOGS_TIME

———- ———- ———- —————– ——————–

1          1          1                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

2          1          2                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

3          1          3                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

4          1          4                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

5          1          5                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

6          1          6                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

7          1          7                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

8          1          8                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

9          1          9                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

10          1         10                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

11          1         11                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

12          1         12                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

13          1         13                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

14          1         14                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

15          1         15                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

16          1         16                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

17          1         17                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

18          1         18                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

19          1         19                 1 Aug 12 2003 18:48:54

19 rows selected.

Full Database Begin Backup Command

Oracle 10g allows all of the data files in the database to be placed in online backup mode using a single command:

SQL> ALTER DATABASE BEGIN BACKUP;

You no longer need to place each tablespace in online backup mode individually:

SQL> ALTER TABLESPACE user BEGIN BACKUP;

SQL> ALTER TABLESPACE example BEGIN BACKUP;

The ALTER DATABASE BEGIN BACKUP command places all data files in the database in online backup mode.  The database must be in mounted or open mode when you issue this command.

Example 1: Issue BEGIN BACKUP command when data files belonging to a tablespace are in READ-ONLY mode

SQL> alter tablespace users read only;

Tablespace altered.

SQL> alter tablespace users begin backup;

alter tablespace users begin backup

*

ERROR at line 1:

ORA-01642: begin backup not needed for read only tablespace ‘USERS’

SQL> alter database begin backup;

Database altered.

Example 2: Issue BEGIN BACKUP command when data files belonging to a tablespace are in READ-ONLY mode

SQL> alter tablespace example offline;

Tablespace altered.

SQL> alter tablespace example begin backup;

alter tablespace example begin backup

*

ERROR at line 1:

ORA-01128: cannot start online backup – file 5 is offline

ORA-01110: data file 5: ‘C:ORACLEORADATAGRIDEXAMPLE01.DBF’

SQL> alter database begin backup;

Database altered.

The two examples above demonstrate that when you issue the ALTER DATABASE BEGIN BACKP command, any read-only and offline data files are simply skipped, and processing continues.

Changes to the ALTER DATABASE END BACKUP command

You can run the ALTER DATABASE END BACKUP command when you have multiple tablespaces still in backup mode.  You can issue the statement to take all data files currently in backup mode out of backup mode.  However, you can use this statement only when the database is mounted, and not open in Oracle9i.  If the database is open, you can only use ALTER TABLESPACE … END BACKUP or ALTER DATABASE DATAFILE … END BACKUP for each affected tablespace or datafile.

In Oracle 10g, you can issue the ALTER DATABASE END BACKUP command when the database is open.

If you issue the command while one of the data files is offline or in read-only mode, a warning message will return:

SQL> alter database end backup;

alter database end backup

*

ERROR at line 1:

ORA-01260: warning: END BACKUP succeeded but some files found not to be in backup mode

Change-Aware Incremental Backups

In previous releases of the Oracle database, RMAN had to examine every block in the data file to determine which blocks had been changed when performing an incremental backup.  The time to perform an incremental backup was proportional to the size of the data files.  Therefore,  performing an incremental backup on a very large database could take some time, even if only a few blocks were changed.

In Oracle 10g, you can create a block change tracking file that records the blocks modified since the last backup.  RMAN uses the tracking file to determine which blocks to include in the incremental backup.  RMAN no longer needs to examine the entire data file.  The time to perform an incremental backup is now proportional to the amount of content modified since the last backup.

Here are the steps RMAN will perform to do an incremental backup:

  1. Read the Block Change Tracking File to determine which blocks in the data file need to be read.
  2. Scan only the changed blocks (See Figure 12.1) in the data file and then back them up.

Figure 12.7 Incremental Backup using Block Change Tracking File

How big is the Block Change Tracking File?

The size of the block change tracking file is proportional to:

  • The database size in bytes: the block change tracking file contains data representing every data file block in the database.  The data is approximately 1/250000 of the total size of the database.
  • The number of enabled threads: In a Real Application Cluster (RAC) environment, the instances update different areas of the tracking file without any locking or inter-node block swapping.  You enable block change tracking for the entire database and not for individual instances.
  • The number of old backups: The block change tracking file keeps a record of all changes between previous backups, in addition to the modification since the last backup.  It retains the change history for a maximum of eight backups.

The size of the file is calculated by the following formula:

Size of the Block Change Tracking File =

( (Threads*2) + number of old backups ) * database size in bytes

250,000

The minimum size for the block change tracking file is 10 MB. Using this formula, a 2 TB database with only one thread and having five backups in the RMAN repository will require a block change tracking file of 59 MB.

Enabling, Disabling and Monitoring Block Change Tracking

By default, Oracle will not record block change information.  To enable this feature, you need to issue the following command:

SQL> alter database enable block change tracking;

To disable this feature, you issue this command:

SQL> alter database disable block change tracking;

To monitor the status of block change tracking, you type:

SQL> select file, status, bytes

2 from   v$block_change_tracking;

STATUS     FILE                       BYTES

———–       —————————-      —————

ENABLED    /dba/backup/01_mf_yzmrr7.chg      10,000,000

Automated Disk-Based Backup and Recovery

Prior to Oracle 10g, disk files that were created by the RMAN utility or ARCH process had no knowledge of one another.  Furthermore, they were not aware of the sizes of the file system on which they created files.  Database administrators needed to routinely clean up the old archive logs or old RMAN files.

It is better to have a unified disk storage location where you can manage all recovery-related files.  Now you can achieve this in Oracle 10g by specifying a Recovery Area.

Recovery Area

The recovery area is a unified disk storage location for all recovery-related files and activities in an Oracle Database.  Those files include:

  • Control file
  • Online redo log files
  • Archived log files
  • Flashback logs
  • Control file autobackups
  • Data file copies
  • RMAN files

Setting up a Recovery Area

The recovery area is defined by setting two initialization parameters.  These two parameters can be dynamically altered or disabled.

  • The db_recovery_file_dest_size sets the disk limit, expressed in bytes
  • The db_recovery_file_dest sets the location for the recovery area

Enabling a Recovery Area

This statement sets the disk limit for recovery area to 100 GB:

SQL> ALTER SYSTEM

SET DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST_SIZE = 100G

This statement sets the recovery area destination:

SQL> ALTER SYSTEM

SET DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST = ‘/dba/backup/’;

Alter a Recovery Area

This statement alters the size of the recovery area:

SQL> ALTER SYSTEM

SET DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST_SIZE = 200G;

Disabling a Recovery Area

This statement disables a recovery area:

SQL> ALTER SYSTEM

SET DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST = ‘ ’;

Recovery Area Space Management

When the recovery area is less than 90% full, Oracle does not delete eligible files immediately, to minimize the need to restore recent files from tape during recovery. The recovery area can thus serve as a kind of cache for tape.

Once the recovery area is 90% full, Oracle will issue a warning to users.  The Oracle database server and RMAN will continue to create files in the recovery area until 100% of the disk limit is reached.

Once the recovery area is 100% full, the RMAN retention policy is used to indicate what files will be deleted in order to make space for newer files.

The db_flashback_retention_target parameter specifies how long Oracle will keep the flashback logs in the flashback recovery area.  However, flashback logs won’t be deleted, even if they exceed the duration specified by the flashback retention period, unless more space is needed in the recovery area for other files.

New RMAN command for Recovery Area

RMAN> BACKUP RECOVERY AREA;

RMAN> BACKUP RECOVERY FILES;

New Recovery Area Dictionary View

Oracle 10g has a new dynamic performance view for monitoring the recovery area:

SQL> desc v$recovery_file_dest

Name                                     Null?    Type

—————————————- ——– ———–

NAME                                              VARCHAR2(513)

SPACE_LIMIT                                       NUMBER

SPACE_USED                                        NUMBER

SPACE_RECLAIMABLE                                 NUMBER

NUMBER_OF_FILES                                   NUMBER

Column Description:

  • NAME: Recovery area name, indicating location string.
  • SPACE_LIMIT: used space by recovery area files in bytes
  • SPACE_RECLAIMABILE: amount of space that can be created by deleting obsolete, redundant, and other low priority files through the space management algorithm.
  • NUMBER_OF_FILE: number of files

Example:

SQL> select * from v$recovery_file_dest;

NAME           SPACE_LIMIT   SPACE_USED    SPACE_RECLAIMABLE NUMBER_OF_FILES

———— ————-   ————  —————– —————-

/dba/backup     2147483648      458219520                  0               49

RMAN Database Dropping and Deregistration

Oracle 10g allows a database to be dropped and its entry removed from the RMAN catalog.

The following statement drops the entire database and removes the database files:

RMAN> drop database;

The statement below drops the entire database, removes the database files, and deletes all backup copies of the database and the archive log files:

RMAN> drop database including backups;

The two statements above drop the database and delete the database files.  However, they do not unregister the database from the RMAN catalog. The following statement will remove the database information from the RMAN catalog:

RMAN> unregister database grid;

Automated TSPITR Instantiation

In previous Oracle releases, you could use RMAN to perform tablespace point in time recovery (TSPITR).  However, you needed to create an auxiliary instance manually.

In Oracle 10g, when you perform tablespace point in time recovery, RMAN creates an auxiliary instance automatically on the same target database server.  RMAN removes the auxiliary instance after you complete the tablespace recovery.

RMAN creates the data files required by the auxiliary instance as specified by set newname, configure auxname, and db_file_name_convert.  RMAN removes these files when the recovery tasks are completed.

Simplified Recovery Manager Cataloging of Backup Files

Every time RMAN backs up a database into backup sets and backup pieces, it updates the RMAN catalog to reflect the backup information.  If a user removes, relocates, or renames a backup piece, you cannot make corresponding changes to the RMAN catalog in the earlier versions of the oracle database.

However, in Oracle 10g, you can use the CATALOG command to enter the new filename or location for backup pieces in the RMAN catalog.  In addition, you can use the CATALOG command to enter user-managed data file copies. The UNCATALOG command is used to remove the backup pieces from the catalog.

Example 1: To catalog a backup piece

RMAN> catalog backuppiece

2> ‘/dba/backup/rman/data01.bkp’;

Example 2: To catalog a user-managed data file copy

RMAN> catalog backup

2> ‘/dba/backup/grid/data01.dbf’;

Example 3: To uncatalog a backup piece

RMAN> change backupiece

2> ‘/dba/backup/grid/data01.bkp’ uncatalog;

RMAN and the new EM (Enterprise Manager)

The new Enterprise Manger in Oracle Database 10g makes the backup a lot easier to work with the new features.

Here is an EM screenshot of configuring Backup Settings:

Figure. 12.8 Configuring Backup Settings in Enterprise Manager

Here is another example of setting up a backup strategy using EM:

Figure 12.9 Another Backup Strategy Using Enterprise Manager

Figure 12.10 Backup Set-up Using Enterprise Manager

Figure 12.11 Backup Set-up Using Enterprise Manager

Figure 12.12 Backup Set-up Using Enterprise Manager

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