How to Install MySQL Database Using Yum groupinstall on CentOS

In this article, let us review how to install MySQL on CentOS using yum. Instead of searching and installing mysql and related packages one-by-one, it is better to install MySQL using yum groups.

If you are interested in installing the full LAMP stack, refer to our earlier article on how to install/upgrade LAMP using yum.

1. Identify the Group name of MySQL Packages

yum grouplist displays all package groups that are available in the repository. As shown below, mysql package group is called “MySQL Database”.

# yum grouplist | grep -i mysql
MySQL Database

2. What is bundled in the “MySQL Database” group?

yum groupinfo displays all the packages that are bundled in a group. This displays the mandatory, default and optional packages that are available in that particular group.

As shown below, “MySQL Database” group contains 1 mandatory package, 6 default packages, and 5 optional packages.

# yum groupinfo “MySQL Database”
Group: MySQL Database
Description: This package group contains packages useful for use with MySQL.
Mandatory Packages:
mysql
Default Packages:
MySQL-python
libdbi-dbd-mysql
mysql-connector-odbc
mysql-server
perl-DBD-MySQL
unixODBC
Optional Packages:
mod_auth_mysql
mysql-bench
mysql-devel
php-mysql
qt-MySQL

3. Install the “MySQL Database” group using yum groupinstall

yum groupinstall will install the “MySQL Database” group of packages as shown below.

# yum groupinstall “MySQL Database”

Resolving Dependencies
Dependencies Resolved

Transaction Summary
=========================
Install 12 Package(s)
Update 0 Package(s)
Remove 0 Package(s)

Installed:
MySQL-python.i386 0:1.2.1-1 libdbi-dbd-mysql.i386 0:0.8.1a-1.2.2
mysql.i386 0:5.0.77-4.el5_4.2 mysql-connector-odbc.i386 0:3.51.26r1127-1.el5
mysql-server.i386 0:5.0.77-4.el5_4.2 perl-DBD-MySQL.i386 0:3.0007-2.el5
unixODBC.i386 0:2.2.11-7.1

Dependency Installed:
libdbi.i386 0:0.8.1-2.1 libdbi-drivers.i386 0:0.8.1a-1.2.2
libtool-ltdl.i386 0:1.5.22-7.el5_4
mx.i386 0:2.0.6-2.2.2 perl-DBI.i386 0:1.52-2.el5

Complete!

Note: If you are having some issues during the installation, verify the full mysql install log to see what you are missing.
4. Verify MySQL Installation

Execute rpm -qa, to confirm that the mysql related packages are installed.

# rpm -qa | grep -i mysql
MySQL-python-1.2.1-1
mysql-5.0.77-4.el5_4.2
mysql-connector-odbc-3.51.26r1127-1.el5
mysql-server-5.0.77-4.el5_4.2
libdbi-dbd-mysql-0.8.1a-1.2.2
perl-DBD-MySQL-3.0007-2.el5

Check the /etc/passwd and /etc/group to make sure it has created a mysql username and group.

# grep mysql /etc/passwd
mysql:x:27:27:MySQL Server:/var/lib/mysql:/bin/bash

# grep mysql /etc/group
mysql:x:27:

5. MySQL Post installation – Execute mysql_install_db

mysql_install_db program will setup the necessary grant tables. The mysql_install_db program gets executed as part of the rpm installation. But, it doesn’t hurt to execute the mysql_install_db program again to make sure the grant tables are setup properly.

# /usr/bin/mysql_install_db –user=mysql
Installing MySQL system tables…OK
Filling help tables…OK
…..
The latest information about MySQL is available on the web at http://www.mysql.com

6. Start MySQL Server

# service mysqld status
mysqld is stopped

# service mysqld start
Starting MySQL: [ OK ]

7. Verify that the MySQL server is up and running.

# /usr/bin/mysqladmin version
/usr/bin/mysqladmin Ver 8.41 Distrib 5.0.77, for redhat-linux-gnu on i686
Copyright (C) 2000-2006 MySQL AB
This software comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY. This is free software,
and you are welcome to modify and redistribute it under the GPL license

Server version 5.0.77
Protocol version 10
Connection Localhost via UNIX socket
UNIX socket /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock
Uptime: 39 sec

Threads: 1 Questions: 2 Slow queries: 0 Opens: 12 Flush tables: 1
Open tables: 6 Queries per second avg: 0.051

# /usr/bin/mysqlshow
+——————–+
| Databases |
+——————–+
| information_schema |
| mysql |
| test |
+——————–+

# /usr/bin/mysqlshow mysql
Database: mysql
+—————————+
| Tables |
+—————————+
| columns_priv |
| db |
| func |
| help_category |
| time_zone_transition |
| time_zone_transition_type |
| user |
+—————————+

Stop and start the mysql server again to make sure they are no issues.

# service mysqld stop
Stopping MySQL: [ OK ]

# service mysqld start
Starting MySQL: [ OK ]

8. Change the MySQL root account password

Change the MySQL root account password to something secure.

# mysql -u root
Welcome to the MySQL monitor. Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 5
Server version: 5.0.77 Source distribution

Type ‘help;’ or ‘\h’ for help. Type ‘\c’ to clear the buffer.

mysql> select host, user from mysql.user;
+———–+——+
| host | user |
+———–+——+
| 127.0.0.1 | root |
| localhost | |
| localhost | root |
+———–+——+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> set password for ‘root’@’localhost’ = PASSWORD(‘DoNotTell$AnyBody’);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> set password for ‘root’@’127.0.0.1’ = PASSWORD(‘DoNotTell$AnyBody’);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

Make sure you are able to login to MySQL using the new password as shown below.

# mysql -u root
ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user ‘root’@’localhost’ (using password: NO)

# mysql -u root -p
Enter password:
Welcome to the MySQL monitor. Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 7
Server version: 5.0.77 Source distribution

Type ‘help;’ or ‘\h’ for help. Type ‘\c’ to clear the buffer.

mysql>

Ref:http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/04/yum-groupinstall-mysql-database/

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How to add a user to the sudoers list

How to add a user to the sudoers list? Beleive it or not, this is a fairly common question and in all reality the answer is quite simple. Adding a user to the sudoers list on a fully installed Linux system such as Debian is only possible via the command visudo. Users in the sudoers list are allowed the privileges to run commands and open files as the root user. In the following quick tutorial, we will show you how adding a new sudoer is quickly done.

How to add a user to the sudoers list:

Open a Root Terminal and type visudo (to access and edit the list)
Using the up/down arrows, navigate to the bottom of the sudoers file that is now displayed in the terminal
Just under the line that looks like the following:

root ALL=(ALL) ALL

Add the following (replacing user with your actual username):

user ALL=(ALL) ALL

Now press Ctrl+X and press Y when promted to save

That’s it, your new user now has root privileges!

Ref:http://www.pendrivelinux.com/how-to-add-a-user-to-the-sudoers-list/

Configuration of VNC-Server on CentOS 6.0 & Above Versions

Steps to configure VNC server on CentOS:

//First verify version & redhat-release by following command:
[root@centos ~]# cat /proc/version
[root@centos ~]# cat /etc/redhat-release

//Install required packages:

[root@centos ~]# yum -y install tigervnc-server xorg*
[root@centos ~]# yum groupinstall “General Purpose Desktop” –y
OR
You can download repected rpm of “tigervnc-server, xorg & General Purpose Desktop” from web.

[root@centos ~]# vncpasswd
Password: supp0rt
Verify: supp0rt

//Edit this file as below
[root@centos ~]# nano /etc/sysconfig/vncservers
VNCSERVERS=”2:root”
VNCSERVERARGS[2]=”-geometry 1024×800″

//Restart VNC-Server services by issuing following command:
[root@centos ~]# service vncserver stop
[root@centos ~]# service vncserver start
OR
[root@centos ~]# service vncserver restart

//Edit this file as below
[root@centos ~]# nano .vnc/xstartup
#twm & //comment last line.
exec gnome-session & //add this line

//Stop all iptables.
[root@centos ~]# /etc/init.d/iptables stop

//Restart VNC-Server services by issuing following command:
[root@centos ~]# service vncserver stop
[root@centos ~]# service vncserver start
OR
[root@centos ~]# service vncserver restart

//Access vnc from browser:
URL: <IP_address>:5802
OR
You can use VNC Viewer to take access.

You will get GUI of the same server.

***********************************************************************

How to stop/start and disable/enable Firewall on Redhat 7 Linux system

How to stop/start and disable/enable Firewall on Redhat 7 Linux system:
———————————————————————–

The firewall on Redhat 7 Linux system is enabled by default. Normally there should not be a need to disable firewall but it may be quite handy for testing purposes etc. On Redhat 7 Linux system the firewall run as firewalld daemon. Bellow command can be used to check the firewall status:

[root@rhel7 ~]# systemctl status firewalld
firewalld.service – firewalld – dynamic firewall daemon
Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/firewalld.service; enabled)
Active: active (running) since Thu 2014-09-04 19:18:47 EST; 3 months 28 days ago
Main PID: 539 (firewalld)
CGroup: /system.slice/firewalld.service
└─539 /usr/bin/python -Es /usr/sbin/firewalld –nofork –nopid

Sep 04 19:18:45 rhel7 systemd[1]: Starting firewalld – dynamic firewall daemon…
Sep 04 19:18:47 rhel7 systemd[1]: Started firewalld – dynamic firewall daemon.

From the above output we can see that the firewall is enabled, which means it will start automatically after reboot and that is also current active. Furthermore, or you can even check all currently applied rules with:

[root@rhel7 ~]# iptables-save

1. Stop and Start RHEL7 firewall
The firewall on Redhat 7 Linux system can be stopped by a following command:

[root@rhel7 ~]# service firewalld stop
Redirecting to /bin/systemctl stop firewalld.service

Stopped firewall will start again after system’s reboot. To start firewall on Redhat 7 Linux system use:

[root@rhel7 ~]# service firewalld start
Redirecting to /bin/systemctl start firewalld.service

2. Disable and Enable RHEL7 firewall
In order to completely disable RHEL7 firewall so it would no load after reboot run:

[root@rhel7 ~]# systemctl disable firewalld
rm ‘/etc/systemd/system/dbus-org.fedoraproject.FirewallD1.service’
rm ‘/etc/systemd/system/basic.target.wants/firewalld.service’

Now the firewall would not start after system’s reboot. To enable the firewall again run:

[root@rhel7 ~]# systemctl enable firewalld
ln -s ‘/usr/lib/systemd/system/firewalld.service’ ‘/etc/systemd/system/dbus-org.fedoraproject.FirewallD1.service’
ln -s ‘/usr/lib/systemd/system/firewalld.service’ ‘/etc/systemd/system/basic.target.wants/firewalld.service’